Transforming Health Care Through Evidence and Collaboration
Transforming Health Care Through Evidence and Collaboration

NIHCM Grants Over $500K for Health Services Research

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Washington, DC — January 14, 2020 — NIHCM Foundation has awarded over $500,000 in grants to support nine investigator-initiated research studies.

"Our grants support research with the potential to positively impact our health care system by building the evidence base and informing decision makers," said Nancy Chockley, Founding President and CEO of NIHCM Foundation.

This year's grantees are exploring the following topics:

From the Center for Connected Health Policy -
Mei Kwong
Christine Calouro
Trey Bierman
Josh Feng, University of Utah
Luca Maini, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Thomas J. Hwang, Harvard University
  • Measuring the Value of Emergency Mental Health Care
    Emergency departments (EDs) frequently treat patients with behavioral health conditions but may be ill-equipped to do so. This study will explore variations in the quality of behavioral health care provided in EDs and the relationship between facility capacity and involuntary detentions.
From the University of Southern California -
Sarah Axeen
Seth Seabury
Michael Menchine
Hanke Heun-Johnson
Ashvin Gandhi, University of California, Los Angeles
Pierre Dubois, Toulouse School of Economics
Susana Vasserman, Stanford University Institute for Economic Policy Research
Maria Steenland, Brown University
Amal Trivedi, Brown University
  • The Zero-Price Effect in the Individual Insurance Market
    Many health insurance exchanges now feature plan options with no premium, and current policy proposals may increase the availability of these plans. This study will explore how zero-price plans affect insurance take-up among different demographic groups and the types of health plans chosen by enrollees.
Coleman D. Drake, University of Pittsburgh
David Anderson, Duke University
  • How Coordinated Care Impacts Competition and Physician Referrals
    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are designed to provide coordinated care for patients, which has implications for referral patterns from primary care providers to specialists. This study will examine how ACO penetration affects competitive dynamics in regional health care markets and the impacts on cost and quality.
From the University of Minnesota -
Russell J. Funk
Pinar Karaca-Mandic
Aks Zaheer
Sohyun Park
Pierre Thomas Léger, University of Illinois at Chicago
Robert Town, University of Texas at Austin
Jeffrey Clemens, University of California at San Diego
From Johns Hopkins University -
Jodi D. Segal
Aditi Sen
Susan Hutfless